What a Journey!!

Dear Deb,

Goodness gracious!!! I mean, I do remember many inflection points of the story and I knew most of what you went through, but when you put it out there in the order of events – from period to hysterectomy – whoa!!!! What a flippin’ journey, lady!!!

There was lots of pain, many lost days of school and work, a ridiculous amount of effort to figure out a livable (and tasty) diet and a bit of a wounded heart. My heart goes out to the girl, the young woman who I met in college and the friend I have had in you, for having needed to be so brave and patient. It sounds like it’s been exhausting and an exercise in endurance. What amazes me is that you have thrived despite this path and its uncomfortable and difficult days.

I’ll have to admit that working in the healthcare field clouded my reading of your story.  I kept thinking, “Who were these doctors you went to?! Were they always listening for the right information?! What is their experience with pelvic pain, complicated periods and endometriosis? Would they think they’d made the right choices if they could hear your story now?”

Your Voice
The reality is that when you were an adolescent, I bet that like any of us in our evolving adolescent bodies and brains, the LAST thing you wanted to talk about was taboo subjects like your period and your ‘development’. It was quite likely that you were just trying to figure out the right words to express what was happening, not thinking about developing a voice for advocating for help and defining for yourself what help should look like. You didn’t know what parts of the experience were ‘normal’ and what parts weren’t. That’s a tough starting point.

I know from experience that the people in our healthcare interactions who are often best at hearing patients are the nurses and nursing staff, as opposed to the doctors (I know this is a generalization – there are pretty fabulous docs out there – but nurses as a general rule rock at listening). The first nurse you mentioned in your letter was your school nurse in 8th grade. What you couldn’t have known was that you probably weren’t her first adolescent girl in crisis and she seemed to hear you without you needing to say much, whereas I expect that plenty of the other providers on your journey were not quite as adept at listening.

The way you navigated the system to get the care you needed probably changed over the years and your voice developed from that of an adolescent to a woman advocating for care, pain management, surgical solutions and information.

Listening
It struck me that your account of the experience included references to different types of listening. First and foremost it was you listening to your body. But beyond that you move from your mother listening to you, to you listening to the experience of others and finally, to health care providers listening to you.

The difference between hearing and listening stands out in what you shared. One example is in your discussions with your doctor after the operation to remove the ovarian cysts. That was the juncture when the endometriosis was confirmed. I remember that was around when my kids were small and you were still planning to have a family. I wonder if your GYN doctor really was hearing your desire to start a family and if she considered alternative therapies at that time.

Over the course of the journey, your health goals were to live without pain, maintain your plans for children and to manage digestive issues that were exacerbated by your diagnosis. You seemed to cobble together answers about how to live those goals. I’m convinced that worked more because you began to find the balance between listening to healthcare practitioners and listening to your body and your own wisdom.

In hindsight, it’s easy to question the extent to which providers, especially during the early years, adequately heard you and developed long-term solutions to help you get comfortable enough for activities of daily living, in accordance with your life’s aspirations for a family, or if they focused primarily on solving the immediate symptoms.

Heard So You Can Be Healed
Ultimately, I am impressed by your faith in the health care system as you continued to turn to doctors and surgeons for answers. I know that there were times between the instances you recounted in your letter when your faith in the health system was waning. You tried a few alternative healing methods over these years and I know that you had some success with pain management working with a chiropractor.

I understand that your hysterectomy decision was difficult to come to as it was a decisive and symbolic step. I know it was a carefully considered decision and you were able to make it with the support and care of your sweet husband and family. I appreciate that your doctor was consultative and could talk with you and hear you through the process, so that you were at peace about the decision.

That said, the surgery was clearly no picnic and the road to recovery has been, of course, longer than desired. There were symptoms that you were never told about until you had them, though they would have been great to understand ahead of time.

We’re old enough to have our self-advocacy impacted by the arrival of the internet. We started getting the chance to browse the web during our early ’20s and over the years it has exploded with information, but not always as informative as we’d hope and not always consistent with what doctors would advise. I still wonder, if a young woman today had the symptoms you experienced, would she end up with a different endometriosis narrative. If so, some of that will be due to the access to information that was not available to you.

So Others Will Be Heard
When you reflect, Deb, on your conversations with various health care professionals through your journey, what are some highlights of when you thought providers were really hearing your story and using that information and understanding of you to help come up with solutions? How would it have made sense for health care providers to assist with the related gastrointestinal and food sensitivity issues? Did you find that the chiropractors or herbalists that you worked with approached your symptoms and the interactions differently than the physicians and physical therapists that you saw?

Thinking of a young woman today who is living with endometriosis or having the first signs of problems, how can she benefit from hearing your story? Are there ways you hope that her health care providers hear her so that they can honor her near-term and long-term goals and help heal her to their best ability? Are there ways to talk about abdominal pain that help get the point across?

 

As I have been writing back to you I have had in mind the Japanese pottery tradition of Kintsugi, the mending of broken pieces with gold or silver.

I hope that the vulnerable places that have emerged from your story can be mended with the valuable power of connections, sharing and community.  I know that for me, sharing my stories and challenges, health or otherwise, with you – have done exactly that and I have consistently emerged stronger.

Thank you again for being willing to be go back through the years and remember the challenges and bring them back into the light. You impress me with your openness, endurance and strength, my friend.

Always,

Liana

 

Author: Liana

Liana is one of the founders of Heard. Healed. Honored. https://www.heardhealedhonored.org/two-friends-heard-healed-honored/

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